AFTRA Members Oppose Massive Deregulation in Florida

AFTRA Members Oppose Massive Deregulation in Florida

Deregulation of talent agents leaves vulnerable the most susceptible in society: children and young adults

MIAMI (April 4, 2011) – The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, AFL-CIO, today released the letter below, also attached, that was sent on March 30 to Denise Grimsley (R), Chair, Florida House Appropriations Committee on March 30, 2011.

The letter, signed by Herta Suarez, AFTRA Miami Executive Director/S. E. Regional Director, which outlines AFTRA’s opposition and concern about legislation that would eliminate oversight of talent agents in the State of Florida, states that AFTRA members believe that Florida’s H.B. 5005 – Deregulation of Professionals and Occupations – is “a move in the wrong direction that will have a negative impact in an industry that has proven to be a provider of revenue to local citizens and the State of Florida.”

AFTRA is appealing to the state to maintain all current levels of regulation of talent agents which provide for the safety and security of children, teens and consumers and supporting the level of professionalism that will boost production in the State of Florida.

About AFTRA
The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, AFL-CIO, are the people who entertain and inform America. In 32 Locals across the country, AFTRA members work as actors, broadcasters, singers, dancers, announcers, hosts, comedians, disc jockeys, and other performers across the media industries including television, radio, cable, sound recordings, music videos, commercials, audio books, non-broadcast industrials, interactive games, the Internet and other digital media. The 70,000 professional performers, broadcasters, and recording artists of AFTRA are working together to protect and improve their jobs, lives, and communities in the 21st century. From new art forms to new technology, AFTRA members embrace change in their work and craft to enhance American culture and society.