INSI North America launches

Posted October 14, 2011

The world is heading for one of the bloodiest years for journalists in the past decade. Ninety-seven media staff have been killed since the start of 2011 in almost 30 countries.

The figures have been compiled by the International News Safety Institute, which is holding a safety debate on Friday in New York called "The Year of Living Dangerously" as it seeks to boost awareness of safety issues for news media with the launch of INSI in North America.

"These numbers are shocking - a dreadful reminder of the need to do something concrete to stop the killing," said INSI Director Rodney Pinder. "INSI is dedicated to real action to help journalists in danger around the world and the launch of INSI North America is a major step toward that end."

The most dangerous countries for journalists are Pakistan and Mexico, where 11 journalists have been killed. These countries have been particularly violent for local journalists, caught up in a spiral of corruption, criminality, ineffective governance and impunity - particularly in the case of Mexico - which has also led to the Americas region being the most dangerous.

Journalists originating from 33 countries have been killed in 29 countries, many of them not traditionally associated with hostile environments. From Vietnam to South Africa, Brazil to the UK and the US, journalists are at risk wherever they are or come from.
INSI, working with Cardiff school of journalism in the UK, has conducted a detailed analysis of the casualties over the first six months of this year. That report, entitled "Killing The Messenger", can be found on the INSI website www.newssafety.org.

Since its inception, the AFTRA Foundation has been a partner of INSI, serving as the organization's U.S. home.